RIGHT HAND TURNING TOOL

This type of tool works well when taking heavy cuts to reduce the diameter of a part. As shown it is designed to cut from right to left but can be reversed using the same angles to cut from left to right (left hand turning tool).  The video Grinding Turning and Facing Tools for the Lathe shows how to apply the information provided in this diagram. Click on the image below to download a PDF file.

 

RHTurning Bit

RIGHT HAND FACING TOOL

This type of tool is used to machine the end of a part or the side of a shoulder. As shown it is designed to face on the right, but it can be reversed using the same angles to face on the left (left hand facing tool). The video Grinding Turning and Facing Tools for the Lathe shows how to apply the information provided in this diagram. Click on the image below to download a PDF file.

 

RH Facing Bit

FLY CUTTING TOOL

This type of tool works well in light fly cutters that hold the tool at an angle of 10º-15º to the work. It is basically the same as a left hand turning tool without the side or end cutting edge angles. The nose radius should be kept around 1/64″ for steel and 1/32″ or so for non ferrous metals. If it’s too small, it will burn out quickly on steel, too large and it will chatter. Fly cutters dissipate heat better than end mills, so I generally run them 30%-50% faster than an end mill of equal size. Click on the image below to download a PDF file of the diagram.

 

Fly Cutting Bit

BOLT CIRCLE DIAMETER CONSTANTS

This is a handy chart for the occasional bolt circle that saves having to set up a rotary table or spacer to do it. Just multiply the constants in the chart by the diameter of the bolt circle you want to create to get the appropriate X and Y dimensions. Click on the image to download a PDF file, laminate it and keep it handy in the shop. Mine is stuck to a filing cabinet with a magnet for easy access.

Bolt Circle Chart

RPM’s for COMMON ALLOYS BASED on the FORMULA: 4 X CUTTING SPEED / DIAMETER

This a quick reference chart that suggests tool and cutter rpm’s for common alloys. They have been calculated using the common formula: RPM = 4 X CUTTING SPEED / DIAMETER. These rpm’s are suggestions only and should be adjusted according to feedrate, the color of the chips (in case of steel) and depth of cut. If a carbide tool is used, the rpm’s may be increased 4-5 times. Click on the image below to download a PDF file of the chart.

CuttingSpeeds-01

Accurate Measurement of Dovetails and Chamfers

A common method to accurately measure the location of angled surfaces such as chamfers or dovetails is to use a pin. The part is held against a flat surface such as a surface plate or angle plate with a pin resting on the flat surface and the angled surface of the part. The distance from the pin to the part is then measured using a height gauge or an indicator. Armed with this measurement and the angle of the surface, the size and location of the angled surface can then be determined using trigonometry. In the following chart, the variables are:

A = The angle of the surface r= The radius of the pin CL= Chamfer Length CH=Chamfer Height M=Measurement from the pin to the end of a shaft, for a chamfer. h=Length of chamfer

The pin diameter must be selected so it rests on the surface being measured.

 

Chamfer Calculations

 

DRILL PRESS SAFETY

I was asked to do a talk at work on the safe operation of the drill press, which was fine with me because I’ve always considered the drill press to be the most dangerous machine in the shop. Why? I’ll go into more detail on that shortly, but basically I’ve seen more people hurt on the drill press than any other machine. The next time you use the drill press, or vertical mill for that matter, remember the few simple safety rules in the following article. They may save you a lot of grief.

I’ve discovered that the PDF reader doesn’t work on some mobile devices and I’m working on it.

 

Download the PDF file .